New Clinical Trials to Improve Cancer Treatment

Researchers at the Royal Adelaide Hospital are set to start clinical trials on a new treatment for lung and ovarian cancers, with the aim to find and hopefully destroy the necessary cells.

New Clinical Trials to Improve Cancer Treatment

Researchers at the Royal Adelaide Hospital in Australia are set to start clinical trials on a new treatment for lung cancer and ovarian cancer.

Adelaide doctors believe they have made a major breakthrough in treatments, and will conduct clinical trials of a new technology to find and destroy dangerous cells.

South Australia's health minister Stephen Wade told the ABC that the partnership driven by AusHealth has linked researchers with pharmaceutical investors and will help to fast-track this important technology for patients.

Cancer Treatment - Printed with Mint Green Pills, Injections and Syringe. Medical Concept with Selective Focus.

This trial is the result of almost a decade of research and development at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. 

The treatment has secured $33 million in funding to move to human trials, after researchers found success in treating mice suffering with lymphoma.

Royal Adelaide Hospital Clinical Trial Unit head professor Michael Brown said in an interview that the treatment deploys APOMAB antibody technology to treat solid tumours and has a strong potential to improve the survival rates among patients. 

The trial would include 18 patients to be observed over the course of six weeks after treatment with the recruitment of patients to begin in early 2020.

The testing uses antibodies with a low dose of radiation and targets a specific protein that is created by dying or otherwise dead cells.

The radiation signal is picked up on a PET scan, enabling to see which patients have received the therapy and how well the chemotherapy is doing its job on the dangerous cells.

The treatment has the potential to change the way solid cancers are fought. It hopes to enhance the effects of chemotherapy, by helping doctors directly target the drug to the cells they need to.

Chemotherapy - Medical Concept. On Background of Medicaments Composition - Red Pills, Injections and Syringe.

The trial aims to test how well the antibodies can target specific cells in order to deliver low-dosage radiation.

The trial will first be tested on lung and ovarian patients, however Professor Brown mentioned researchers are hopeful the approach will also boost the effect of other treatments.

AusHealth managing director and CEO highlighted this is a partnership from the culmination of a decade of research and development by Professor Brown and his team.

They look forward to the outcomes of the trial and to evaluate the success of targeted radiation and whether it has the potential to be a breakthrough treatment.

South Australian Health Minister mentioned the $33 million investment in the local research was the largest in 20 years for Adelaide to develop medical technology.

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